stoopbeck: (Jareth cruel eyes)
"These are the top 106 books most often marked as "unread" by LibraryThing’s users. As in, they sit on the shelf to make you look smart or well-rounded.
Bold the ones you've read, underline the ones you read for school, italicize the ones you started but didn't finish."


YAY BOOK-RELATED MEMES )
stoopbeck: (DoctorHorrible PhD in Horribleness)
I FINALLY HAVE A COPY OF THE DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS!! I AM SO EXCITED! YAY FOR BOOKMOOCH!

I just hope it's not disappointing, like Stranger in a Strange Land, which had come so highly recommended. SHAME ON YOU, HEINLEIN. WOMEN ARE PEOPLE, TOO. I got so disgusted with the lack of dimension in his female characters I never even made it to the dirty bits of the book. SAD TIMES.

But The Day of the Triffids is already awesome.

Poor On the Road! I promise I haven't forgotten you! You were just too rich and dream-like and there is only so much of stream-of-consciousness-type writing I can take in one sitting!
stoopbeck: (Liberty/Justice OTP)
From The Gentle Art of Verbal Self-Defense (published in 1980):

Children are often highly skilled in verbal confrontations with their parents, especially in Blamer Mode. Male children hone their skills and increase them as they grow older. Female children are somewhat more likely to accomplish what they want by virtue of their "adorableness," and to rely on their dimples and curls and sitting in people's laps being cute. In the process they forget any verbal skills they might otherwise have acquired, and when they cease to be adorable and are too big to climb into laps anymore, they are utterly vulnerable. If a woman is able to convince a man that she is cute and adorable, it may work. But it is unlikely to work on anyone except a man with whom she is living in an intimate relationship of some kind. Beating your cute little fists against the hairy chest of your boss, your professor, your male colleagues, and so on, WILL NOT WORK. That may be why systems of this kind are ordinarily recommended to women who prefer to remain within the confines of the home; and it shows great good sense on the part of those who devise them that they see this and state it quite frankly in their books, articles, and lectures.


a) This is so far from my own childhood experience that I'm not entirely sure what to say.

b) But I wanted to beat my cute little fists against the hairy chests of the male oppressors in my life! :( I like how there isn't even the option of the boss or the professor being female.

c) FEMALES HAVE NO VERBAL SKILLZ, YO. THIS IS BECAUSE WE ARE TOO BUSY WORKING ON OUR WILES TO, YOU KNOW, LEARN HOW TO SPEAK. OR SOMETHING.
stoopbeck: (Default)
Roadie, were all your Agatha Christie expectations met? BECAUSE MINE TOTALLY WERE!! Best episode, EVER.

I finished reading Twilight. It took me for freaking ever. Mostly because I kept having to take breaks from reading to rant to anyone who would listen to me about the characters, much to the annoyance of my family.

And here's why. )
stoopbeck: (Default)
I love to read. I'll read almost anything, which is why I came home from the bookstore this week with three books: Mr. Monk and the Two Assistants, a book based on the hit TV series Monk; Jim Butcher's Storm Front, the first in the Dresden Files; and Passage, by Connie Willis, who is one of my very favorite authors.

The Monk book was cute and funny and fluffy, and something that should be an episode.

Storm Front was pretty good. I had already read the second book in the series, Fool Moon, so getting through the exposition ("I'm a wizard! People are blind and ignorant! SHINY MAGICS YAYS!!") was a little rough, but the story moved along nicely, and the characters were enjoyable. Especially since the short-lived TV show had the hot leper doctor from that episode of Monk as Harry Dresden. Mmmm.

Anyway. The point of this post was how awesome the third book was. I picked it up and was instantly consumed by it. I couldn't put it down. People came up and talked to me and I had no idea they were there. My heart raced as I sped through the pages, to the point where I had to stop and take breaks to calm down. I read for about six or seven hours straight, champing at the bit for the ending. And, like Lincoln's Dreams, this book made me cry like crying was going out of style. I haven't cried that hard since I watched Pan's Labyrinth.

Books that amuse you for an afternoon are a dime a dozen. Books that change the way you look at life are so much rarer, and while I don't know that I'll ever be able to read this book again, it can definitely sit on my shelf of honor with pride.
stoopbeck: (Default)
So! Those of you on my flist who enjoy grammar and reading and whatnot, want to help me parse this paragraph? )

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